Fortnight of SMACC Talks: December 1st – 15th


As many of you know, there is a close relationship between the SMACC conference and Injectable Orange. Each fortnight we will be sharing a few of our favourite talks from the 2016 SMACC Dublin Conference as they are released via podcast or vodcast. Every past talk from the previous SMACC conferences are available via the SMACC website. For those of you who haven’t experienced SMACC, we hope these serve as the wardrobe door to your educational Narnia.

 
05/12/16 – Things that scare me

Speaker: Ross Fisher
Meta-description: In our professional and private lives there are things that scare us, how we manage that fear defines us.
Podcast:

Video:

THINGS THAT SCARE ME-Ross Fisher from Social Media and Critical Care on Vimeo.


06/12/16 – Where is the love in critical care?

Speaker: Liz Crowe
Meta-description: Critical Care is a place where love/passion and commitment must flourish, professional to patient, leaders to teams and colleagues, educator to trainee, skill to humanity- this is how we do it while maintaining our technical skills and our sanity.
Podcast:

Video:

WHAT’S LOVE GOT TO DO WITH IT–Liz Crowe from Social Media and Critical Care on Vimeo.


07/12/16Disaster Triage: Who gets what?
Speaker: Sara Gray
Meta-description: What happens in a mass casualty disaster when you run out of beds? Out of ventilators? Out of blood? Come discuss how (or whether) we should triage scarce resources during disasters.
Podcast:

Video:

Disaster Ethics- Who gets what- -Sara Gray from Social Media and Critical Care on Vimeo.


12/12/16 – The Immediate Responder and the Disaster Gap.
Speaker: Christina H. Hernon, M.D., FACEP
Abstract: After a major formative experience at a life-threatening mass casualty incident (MCI), emergency physician Christina Hernon felt incredibly unprepared despite over 2 decades of training in emergency and first response. Despite every first aid, first responder, and emergency course teaching students to ask, “Is the scene safe?” and instructing them not to enter an unsafe scene, all of this training is completely inadequate for those present the very moment an incident occurs, who are then amidst and surrounded by an unsecured and potentially unsafe scene. Afterwards, she had an acute stress reaction exactly like after rough calls in prehospital Emergency Medical Services, yet was offered none of the typical supports offered to first responder agencies or hospital personnel. Feeling somehow betrayed, but unsure what to be mad at, she tried to understand why she felt so unprepared and overlooked. In deconstructing and reflecting on the experience, she self-identified neither as bystander nor first responder, but as an on scene, immediately responding, victimized rescuer. Realizing that she didn’t fit into any already existing category, she uncovered a new group of rescuers and an undefined time period that we need to give attention to. The Disaster Gap is the time between the moment an incident occurs, through the first call for help, and until the first of the clearheaded First Responders arrives. In this definable time gap, the only available rescuers are people who are on scene when the event happens, who may be traumatized by their experience themselves, and who, regardless of tools or training, take immediate action to help another person or make the situation better. These Immediate Responders are present at virtually every scene and have been for all of time, yet we know very little about them, their actions, their safety, their impact, and their recovery. By trying to understand the Disaster Gap and Immediate Responders, we can improve training, preparedness, resilience, and recovery.
Podcast:

Video:

The Impromptu Immediate Responder- Christina Hernon from Social Media and Critical Care on Vimeo.


Don’t forget to subscribe to the SMACC Podcast – via iTunes or your preferred podcast app. Also remember there is a third and final small release of tickets for DASsmacc Berlin on the 1st Feb 2017.